Deconstructionism, How is it emerging?

What is Deconstructionism?

Deconstructionism is movement in design that emerged in the late 1980’s.  The idea is to show how something is constructed, but still be functional as a form of art or architecture. One of the unique things about this movement is that it forces the viewer to ponder about how things are put together. It’s philosophy states that “architecture is a language capable of communicating meaning and of receiving treatments by methods of linguistic philosophy”.  Some of the leading architects such as: Frank Gehry, Im Pei, and many other architectural firms have created designs in this style.  Check out some examples below:

Frank Gehry on Deconstructionism

Although we usually think of this architect as being more commercial when talking about his architectural designs, he has also designed residential spaces.  The image below is an example of deconstructionism in a residential space.  This is the house that Frank Gehry designed for himself, and legend states that the neighbors were not thrilled to have this in their neighborhood.

Deconstructed Exterior of Gehry House by Frank Gehry

Deconstructed Interior Space of Gehry House by Frank Gehry

Im Pei on Deconstructionism

One of the most recognized forms of architecture is the entrance to the Louvre Museum in Paris.  Although there is much criticism on how modern the look is in comparison to the traditional form of architecture around it, it still is a great example of deconstructionism architecture.

Im Pei design of the Entrance to the Louvre Museum in Paris. 1989.

SITE Architects on Deconstructionism

In the mid 1980’s a architecture firm by the name of SITE architects, started to produce designs for a company called BEST Products.  The interesting thing about their designs was the emphasis that the firm put into how they would push the limits of creativity in the deconstruction movement.  These are some of the best examples of what a creative team can produce, while keeping the structure functional.

SITE Architects, BEST Products Deconstructed Store. 1984.

This building was constructed to show that the building would literally open and close every day for business.

SITE Architects, BEST Products Deconstructed Store. 1975. Deconstructed entrance to the Notch Showroom store.

SITE Architects, BEST Products Deconstructed Store. 1984. Building shows how the bricks are literally falling off the buildings facade.

SITE Architects. BEST Products. Tilt Showroom 1976. Shows the entrance to the showroom being tilted as if it is being deconstructed from the facade of the building.

Dallas on Deconstructionism

Dallas is known for it emerging architecture by leading renowned international architects.  In 2012, the construction of Perot Museum of Nature and Science by the architecture firm Morphosis Architects has been introduced to the famous skyline of the city.  This new building shows that Deconstructionism is still emerging as a form of design, and may be the new look for contemporary architectural structures.

Perot Museum of Nature and Science by Morphosis Architects. Dallas, Texas.2012.

Deconstructionism in Furniture Design

As we learn more about architecture design, we notice that a lot of the movements that happen in the architectural world tend to spill into the interior design world.  Both worlds are very similar when you talk about the process of design.  In the past year, we have seen that this movement has made its mark in the furniture world of interior design.  The general public is beginning to look for the “new” innovative design in the furniture industry and they may have found it!

Although Deconstructionism is not new as a movement, it is new in furniture design.  Since the piece appears to look like a raw frame and completely unfinished, the look of deconstructionism in the furniture world is controversial.  Check out the images below to form a opinion on what you think about this movement.

Deconstructed Furniture in Room Setting

Deconstructed Wing Chair

Deconstructed Wing Chair-Back View

Straight Lined Post-Modernism Tuxedo Styled Chair

My personal, professional opinion is that as a movement in furniture, it will probably be short lived.  This look doesn’t appear to be as shocking when done on periodic pieces of furniture, like the the first image above.   When the piece of furniture becomes more straight lined and contemporary the look seems to have a  unfinished, undesirable quality to it as a style.  Many older pieces of furniture that date back 50+ years would have been constructed with burlap sacks, horse hair, and tacked upholstery.  The last example featuring the tuxedo styled chair is the ideal look of what you would find when deconstructing a chair around that time period.  As far as comfort,  I feel that over time it would eventually give you splinters because of the raw wood .  Also it may start to poke and scratch you from the tacking or filling inside the cushions.  If you are looking to make a statement in the room for non-functional purposes, then feel free to implement this design style.  If you are someone that is looking for functionality in their furniture,  this look is probably not for you.

The Deconstruction Movement in any form of design that has been seen as controversal.  It has a amount of shock value that many have a hard time grasping because of its  extreme contemporary design, even when using a traditional frame.

At Fabrics and Frames we have not yet been requested to design a piece of furniture in this Deconstruction style, but think that is would be both interesting and challenging to tackle for that very sophisticated, trendy client. Since we custom build our furniture from the ground up one piece at a time our intimate knowledge of the skeleton frame will give us an advantage when constructing this type of furniture. For more information about designing or where to get custom looks like these please visit our website:

www.fabricsandframes.com

We are currently located at 5322 Alpha Rd, Dallas, Texas 75240972-385-4097.  Please contact us if you have any questions about this blog atandy@fabricsandframes.com, and or follow us on Facebook!http://www.facebook.com/pages/Fabrics-and-Frames-Furniture/156825517684205

Writen By: Erica Guajardo

Edited By: Linda Decuir

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4 thoughts on “Deconstructionism, How is it emerging?

  1. Pingback: https://fabricsandframesfurniture.wordpress.com/2012/06/26/deconstructionism-how-is-it-emerging/ « Erica Guajardo's Blog

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