The Evolution of the Chaise Lounge

Chaise lounges and daybeds are two of the most popular pieces of furniture that consumers want to own for many reasons.  In today’s contemporary design, this piece is used to cozy up with your favorite loved ones, makes a perfect reading space, and is a great way to create a inviting family styled hangout in your room.  Since this item is currently so popular in modern day design, I decided to explore its history and its interesting past. How long has the chaise lounge been around and how many different styles does it lend itself to?

The first chaise lounge was documented around the time of  3100-2890 BC.  The Egyptians  initially designed of this style of furniture for their pharaohs, constructing the daybed  originally from palm sticks and rawhide.  After realizing that this design was not long-lasting they started creating a more sturdy assembly out of a practice of building known as mortise and tenon construction.

Egyptian Chaise Lounge 3100-2890 B.C.

Egyptian Chaise Lounge
3100-2890 B.C.

Greeks and Romans both had their hands in the design and development of the chaise lounge as well.  Both of these cultures used this style of furniture  as the perfect piece of furniture for enjoying food and social gatherings.  Although the 8th century Greeks showed their gods and goddesses lounging on daybeds which they referred to as “kline’s” or symposium, these particular daybeds would commonly be used to promote good digestion during eating.  Because of their role in aiding digestion, particular rituals of how to eat and lounge during a meal were common using chaise lounges.

The same practices were commonly shown in the Roman’s lives as well.  What differed from the Roman and Greeks was the construction of the Roman chaise lounges.  The Roman daybed would often be constructed beginning with a decorative frame which was made out of wood or caste bronze.  Since the Romans did not practice upholstery, they made their furniture comfortable by using pillows.

Greek Styled Chaise Lounge

Greek Styled Chaise Lounge

Another culture that  was inspirational in the development of the daybed was the French. The French were very instrumental in the development of the currently styled chaises.  Through research of the daybed style of sofa, I found that there are over half a dozen different French implemented styles of the chaise lounge.  If you were to study the history of the French chaise it seems that it gradually became a study in ergonomics.  Rooms were built around the chaise lounges to help curing symptoms of female hysteria. It was a tool used to help females relax and catch them when fainting from their corsets being too tight. As you can see the chaise lounge has been around for centuries. From the very first civilizations to modern day civilization, chaise lounges have continued to be popular with consumers.

Tufted Fainting Sofa

Throughout the years the chaise lounge has evolved into a piece of furniture that can be made in many different styles.  From fainting sofas to sun loungers and anything in between, this is a piece of furniture that promotes relaxation and togetherness.  Here at Fabrics and Frames Furniture we  can build, re-build, or create any style of chaise you can think of. With our huge selection of designer fabrics, both for indoors or out, and our expertise in designing and constructing high quality custom hardwood frames with spring systems included, we understand what it takes to build the furniture of your dreams. Whether you need a completely new custom piece, want to refurbish an existing one, or just need new cushions for your outdoor chaise, Fabrics and Frames is the place to shop. For more information on  where to get more ideas on designing and custom looks  please visit our website:

www.fabricsandframes.com

We are currently located at 5322 Alpha Rd, Dallas, Texas 75240972-385-4097.  Please contact us if you have any questions about this blog atandy@fabricsandframes.com, and or follow us on Facebook!

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Fabrics-and-Frames-Furniture/156825517684205

Written by: Erica Guajardo

Edited by: Linda Decuir

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